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Italian Wine Regions

Italy is the 3rd largest wine producer in the world, as well as being the oldest wine producing area. There are 20 wine producing regions in Italy (corresponding with the 20 political regions).

Abruzzo:
The volumes produced here exceed those of the entire nations of Austria, Chile, Hungary or even Greece. And not only are they proving to dominate in quantities produced, but quality is not lacking.

Aosta Valley:
A small region nestled in the Western Alps along the French border. Vineyards cover 635 hectares and yearly production is 22, 000 hectolitres of fine Itanlian red wine and white wine.

Italian Wine RegionsApulia:
Dry, fruity whites and reds of notable character are produced here, where the conditions are ideal

Basilicata:
This is a historically desolate region at the heart of the southern peninsula.

Calabria:
This region is known as the metaphorical toe of the Italian boot, referring to the shape of the country. It was noted as a garden of the ancient Greeks, who referred to southern Italy as Enotria, the land of wine.

Campania:
It was called “Campania Felix” by the ancient Romans, because vines prospered on the sun-drenched slopes of the region’s volcanic rise like nowhere else in the Empire.

Emilia-Romagna:
Emilia and Romagna meet at the capital of Bologna. They rely on native vines for wines that are affordable, easy to drink and ideally suited for Italian cooking.

Friuli-Venezia-Giulia:
The nation’s first dry whites of modern class blossomed forth here, Italy’s northeast corner simply referred to as Friuli.

Latium:
White wines account for more than 90% of production, although reds have challenged this supremacy, but whites still remain majority.

Liguria:
The slopes of this Italian Riviera extend along the Ligurian Sea from the border of France to the border of Tuscany and provide little space for vines.

Lombardy:
This is probably Italy’s most populous and prosperous region, although not very well known for its wines as its neighbours.

Marches:
This peaceful Adriatic region is known for Verdicchio, which has become one of Italy’s most dignified white wines.

Piedmont:
This region is renowned for wines from native varieties grown in vineyards that have been cultivated with devotion for centuries.

Sardinia:
This is an enchanting Mediterranean island which produces a variety of wines, all distinguished.

Sicily:
Ranking as the largest island of the Mediterranean and the largest region of Italy, Sicily is also the nation’s most prolific producer of wine.

Trantino-Alto Adige:
The vines here climb the slopes of the Alps. This region is mostly known for its white wines.

Tuscany:
Including the region of Florence, which has rapidly evolved into Italy’s leading provider of modern red wines.

Umbria:
Umbria is home to the wine of enduring fame, Orvieto. This region is known as “green heart of Italy”.

Veneto:
Veneto is Italy’s leader in the production of classified wine, with Bardolino, Soave and Valpolicella accounting for hundred of millions of bottles a year.

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